Help with Questions to Jane Eyre: What pronoun does Rochester

  1. What pronoun does Rochester use as he refers to Adele? Why? (ch. 14)
  2. How does Rochester’s treatment of Jane change after their conversation at the beginning of Chapter 15?
  3. What gothic elements do we see in Chapter 15? Speculate their origins.
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3 Answer(s)
  1. What pronoun does Rochester use as he refers to Adele? Why? (ch. 14)

Rochester’s first use of French is to discipline Adèle when she opens her present: ‘let your operation be conducted in silence: tiens-toi tranquille, enfant; comprends-tu?’ (Jane Eyre, 110). For Adèle, French imposes discipline more than it incites creativity. She uses the language derivatively and in imitation of her mother who had schooled her. Adèle’s use of French reveals her attitude towards people: she elevates her guardian to the rank of French aristocrat with her addition of the particle to his name: M. Edouard Fairfax de Rochester (Jane Eyre, 101) and affectionately grants her governess French citizenship when she addresses her with the diminutive French form of her name: Jeannette (Jane Eyre, 94).

Answered on 28.06.2017.
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2. How does Rochester’s treatment of Jane change after their conversation at the beginning of Chapter 15?

 

He becomes more confident to her. Rochester fulfills his promise to Jane to tell her about his and Adèle’s pasts. At night she  hears what sound like fingers brushing against the walls, and an eerie laugh soon emanates from the hallway. She hears a door opening and hurries out of her room to see smoke coming from Rochester’s door. Jane dashes into his room and finds his bed curtains ablaze. She douses the bed with water, saving Rochester’s life.He says to her”You have saved my life:  I have a pleasure in owing you so immense a debt.  I cannot say more.  Nothing else that has being would have
been tolerable to me in the character of creditor for such an obligation:  but you:  it is different;–I feel your benefits no
burden, Jane.” He paused; gazed at me:  words almost visible trembled on his lips,- -but his voice was checked. “Good-night again, sir.  There is no debt, benefit, burden, obligation, in the case.”

Answered on 28.06.2017.
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3. What gothic elements do we see in Chapter 15? Speculate their origins.

The ghostly laugh at the end of the chapter, emanating near the attic of the manor, heightens the Gothic suspense of the novel, as do Mrs. Fairfax’s curious commands to Grace Poole. The whole novel follows the Gothic tradition utilizes elements such as supernatural encounters, remote locations, complicated family histories, ancient manor houses, dark secrets, and mysteries to create an atmosphere of suspense and terror, and the plot of Jane Eyre includes most of these elements. Although Brontë’s use of Gothic elements heightens her reader’s interest and adds to the emotional and philosophical tensions of the book, most of the seemingly supernatural occurrences are actually explained as the story progresses.

Answered on 28.06.2017.
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