Need online help Gulliver’s Travels: How does the narrative satirize all things Neoclassical

  • How does the narrative satirize all things Neoclassical? Can we categorize Gulliver’s Travels as a Neoclassical text if it is poking fun at its characteristics?
  • According to Thomas Hobbes: In such condition, there is no place for industry; because the fruit thereof is uncertain: and consequently no culture of the earth; no navigation, nor use of the commodities that may be imported by sea; no commodious building; no instruments of moving, and removing, such things as require much force; no knowledge of the face of the earth; no account of time; no arts; no letters; no society; and which is worst of all, continual fear, and danger of violent death; and the life of man, solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short. Does Part I of Gulliver’s Travels agree that “life of man, solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short”?
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